Kasowitz Pro Bono Client’s Allegations are the Subject of Major New York Times Investigative Story on U.S. Military Policy

Kasowitz Pro Bono Client’s Allegations are the Subject of Major New York Times Investigative Story on U.S. Military Policy

Claims asserted by Kasowitz pro bono client Gregory Buckley, Sr. are the subject of a major New York Times investigative story into U.S. Military policy in Afghanistan. The story, “U.S. Soldiers Told to Ignore Sexual Abuse of Boys by Afghan Allies,” examines the U.S. military’s failure to address rampant sexual abuse among armed Afghan commanders, police officers, and other Afghan men holding positions of authority in the country. Mr. Buckley is quoted in the article concerning his family’s belief that the military’s failure to address this abuse was a substantial factor in the death of their son, Lance Cpl. Gregory Buckley, Jr., and two other Marines, who were killed by an Afghan boy living on the Helmand Province base who was a domestic servant of Afghan Police Commander Sarwar Jan. In his final phone call home, Lance Cpl. Buckley, Jr. explained to his father that upon raising concerns about the fact that Afghan commanding officials at the base possessed domestic servants who were pressed into sexual slavery, he was told by his superiors to look the other way because sexual abuse of young boys was part of Afghan culture. The Buckley family strongly believes that the boy who killed their son and the two other Marines did so out of frustration at the Marine Corps’ ongoing pattern of permitting the abuse to occur at the base. The Buckley family has filed a lawsuit demanding the Marine Corps provide more information about the circumstances surrounding Lance Cpl. Buckley, Jr.’s death. Kasowitz partner Michael J. Bowe represents the family pro bono. The Times article reports that the U.S. military is now coming under heavy scrutiny as information continues to emerge about the consequences of its apparent policy to ignore the abuse. In addition to the murders of Lance Cpl. Buckley, Jr. and the two other Marines, the policy has been blamed for the discharge and career ruin of soldiers across the U.S. armed forces who have spoken out or taken action to stop the abuse.

Read The New York Times article “U.S. Soldiers Told to Ignore Sexual Abuse of Boys by Afghan Allies.”